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K9SLY's Ham Shack - Dan Gillenwater


K9SLY
Dan Gillenwater
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K9SLY United States

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Other Callsigns
KI4NOF

My Ham Radio Interests
My involvement in communications centers around furthering the government's ability to communicate during emergencies.
To that end, I support the Arlington County RACES mission to develop emergency communications training and enhance the Emergency Support Function.
The Arlington Radio Public Service Club (ARPSC) provides support for the RACES function.
Please stop by W4AVA.ORG to learn more...

Equipment
Yaesu FT-897D (Station)
Yaesu FT-7800 (Mobile)
Yaesu VX-7R (Portable)

Vintage Rigs:

Yaesu FT 101E Transciver
Yaesu YC-601 Digital Display
Yaesu YO-100 Monitor Scope
Yaesu SP- 101 Speaker/phone patch

Drake R-4B Receiver
Drake T-4XB Transmitter
MN-4 Antenna Tuner
MS-4 Speaker

Hellicrafters SX-43 Receiver
Hellicrafters R-46 Speaker

Kenwood TR-7950 2 meter Mobile

Antennas;
Crushcraft 7.8 dB Dual Band Yagi
2 meters & 440

Hy-Gain AV-18VS Vertical for
10, 15, 20, 40, and 80 Meters

Software:
Ham Radio Deluxe
N3FJP's Amateur Radio Software for contesting

Other Interests
About my Call Sign & QSL Card...

K-9 Sylvester (Sly)

I have been a police officer for 23 years. 10 of those years I spent with the best partner...

Sylvester's story starts in the soviet republic of Georgia (former USSR) in 1991. After being washed out of the military he was sold to a US vendor for police service and shipped to the USA. My Department purchased him in 1992 for $2,500.

Sly and I completed Police K-9 Training in April 1993. We worked midnight patrol for seven months and were the first K-9 Team, in my department, selected to be crossed-trained for criminal apprehension and narcotics detection.

During our 10 years on the street we were responsible for more than 300 criminal apprehensions (some resulted in bites!) Over 1500 narcotics searches and countless misdemeanor arrests. Resulting in the seizure of hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, property and drugs.

Sylvester was retired from police service in April 2002 as I continue a career as a detective in Computer Forensics.

Sylvester passed in January of 2003.

This call sign is my way of keeping a part of him with me and remembering his service to our community...

Clubs
Arlington Radio Public Service Club

K9SLY Updated Profile - 1/4/2015 5:12:13 AM


K9SLY is Connected to the following - 9/16/2010 1:27:01 PM

W6QT WB4IUY K3JEL
K9SLY's Blog Post - 9/16/2010 1:27:01 PM

About my Call Sign & QSL Card...

K9SLY

K-9 Sylvester (Sly)

I have been a police officer for 23 years. 10 of those years I spent with the best partner...

Sylvester's story starts in the soviet republic of Georgia (former USSR) in 1991. After being washed out of the military he was sold to a US vendor for police service and shipped to the USA. My Department purchased him in 1992 for $2,500.

Sly and I completed Police K-9 Training in April 1993. We worked midnight patrol for seven months and were the first K-9 Team, in my department, selected to be crossed-trained for criminal apprehension and narcotics detection.

During our 10 years on the street we were responsible for more than 300 criminal apprehensions (some resulted in bites!) Over 1500 narcotics searches and countless misdemeanor arrests. Resulting in the seizure of hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, property and drugs.

Sylvester was retired from police service in April 2002 as I continued my career.

Sylvester passed in January of 2003.

This call sign & QSL Card is my way of keeping a part of him with me and remembering his service to our community...

You can view my QSL card on my shack profile or better yet make a contact with me and I'll send you one!
73,
Dan
K9SLY
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K9SLY's Blog Post - 9/15/2010 9:25:40 PM

Vintage Rig Profile - The Drake Twins

Here is a little background on my first HF station.

The Drake company was founded in 1943 by Robert L. Drake in Ohio and manufactured low pass and high pass filters for government and amateur radio service. After World War II, Drake began producing amateur radio gear. Many Drake receivers, transmitters, and transceivers manufactured from the 1950s through the 1970s are still in active use today by collectors of vintage amateur radio equipment.

The R.L. Drake Company produced the R4B as a refinement of their previous popular R4 and R4A models. The R4B covers:  3.5-4, 7-7.5, 14-14.5, 21-21.5 and 28.5-29 MHz plus ten additional 500 kHz crystal positions (with optional crystals). Modes of reception include:  SSB, CW and AM. The dial accuracy is and impressive ±1 kHz. Features include: PBT, Line out, Crystal Calibrator (25 kHz), RF Gain, Mute Jack, Speaker Jack, Anti-Vox Jack and Dial Lamp. This radio requires an external speaker. The R-4B will transceive with the T-4XB tranmsitter.

The Drake T-4XB is an HF amateur band transmitter covering 80 through 10 meters. Four additional crystal sockets are available for 500 kHz ranges from 1.8-30 MHz (except 2.3-3, 5-6 and 11-11.5 MHz). Modes include USB, LSB, CW and AM. Input power is 300 watts PEP SSB, 260 watts AM/SSB. The solid-state VFO provides 1 kHz dial accuracy. VOX or PTT may be selected.

The Drake MN-4 matching network matches 50 ohm transmitter output to coax antenna feeding with VSWR of at least 5:1. Frequency coverage is:  3.5-4, 7-7.3, 14-14.5, 21-21.45 and 28-29.7 MHz with up to 200 watts continuous. It features and integral wattmeter that reads forward power in watts and VSWR directly; can be calibrated to read reflected power. The rear panel features SO-239 jacks for input and output.

The Drake MS-4 external speaker features a 5 x 7 inch speaker for clear, rich sound. 11 x 6.25 x 11.6 inches. The black, all metal cabinet features four legs. This speaker comes with an audio cable wired into the speaker and which terminates to a male RCA phono plug.

Rounding out my Drake Station is an Astatic D-104 Mic. The D104 has always been a great standard in many forms of radio including ham amateur radio, cb radio and even commercial broadcasting. Astatic Microphone Laboratory was found in 1933 by two Amateur Radio Operators. The D104 Mic first sold for a little more than seven dollars. The D104 Microphone first earned it's reputation and popularity on AM Amateur Radio.
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K9SLY is Connected to the following - 9/1/2010 8:31:47 PM

KC0WVY W5DUG KE0NA
K9SLY Uploaded a Picture - 9/1/2010 8:31:47 PM


Kenwood TR-7950
Kenwood TR-7950

K9SLY is Connected to the following - 9/1/2010 2:31:04 PM

K7MRE K5CXO
K9SLY Uploaded a Picture - 9/1/2010 2:31:04 PM


Hallicrafters SX-43 & R-44 Speaker
Hallicrafters SX-43 & R-44 Speaker

K9SLY's Blog Post - 9/1/2010 8:50:56 AM

Vintage Rig Profile- Hallicrafters SX-43

Hallicrafters SX-43 Receiver

Introduced in 1947 at a price of $169.50 this unit was advertised as being built in the “Hallicrafters Classic Tradition”. To Give Amateurs “More Value” and “Greater Performance on AM, FM & CW”. Some sixty years later I added this unit to my shack just to have a piece of Hallicrafters history. I love the green glow the lights of the SX-43 gives off.

The Bandspread for the SX-43 is calibrated for the 80, 40, 20, and 10 meter ham bands. AM broadcast and shortwave coverage is continuous from 540 KHz to 44 MHz in four bands. A separate bandswitch setting for the 20 meter ham band is provided covering only 14 to 14.3 MHz. Both AM and FM are covered from 44 to 55 MHZ. The SX-43 covers the 86 to 109 MHz for band FM only. The FM broadcast band uses an IF of 10.7 MHz, and the shortwave and AM broadcast bands use an IF of 455 KHz. It is dual conversion for AM in the 44-55 MHz band which includes the 6 meter band. The second conversion to the lower IF improves selectivity.
Like all other Hallicrafters with the "X" in the model name, the SX-43 is equipped with a crystal filter.

Hallicrafters made the SX-43 family-friendly by color-coding the controls. To receive the AM broadcast band, you would set all of the controls to the red dots or red-labeled positions, tune the band with the main tuning knob, and of course control the audio output with the volume control. To receive FM, you set the controls as before except for the reception and band selector knobs which were moved to the green dots.
The SX-43 needs a matching transformer for its 500 or 5000 ohm impedance audio output. The R-44 speaker was designed as a match for the SX-43.

I hope you enjoyed this write up on just one of the vintage rigs in my shack.

Dan
K9SLY
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K9SLY is Connected to the following - 8/31/2010 6:39:45 AM

OK2IEN NR0J
K9SLY's Blog Post - 8/31/2010 6:39:45 AM

My First HF Radio & Shack

Unlike most hams I didnt get my license unit I was in my thirties. While I had grown up with citizen band radio, back when you needed a license, I never got interested in amateur radio until 9/11. I got my tech license and joined a local club to assist with emergency communications in my community. Shortly after I got my general ticket I received my first HF radio and antenna from a club member. I put the antenna together in the back yard and by the time my wife got home, I had the cables run inside & the radio set up on the dining room table. I hooked everything up and after a few minutes the Drake R4-B came to life, glowing and buzzing it was wonderful! As I tuned the band it made a cool whistling sound that sent the dog running for cover. When it came time for dinner we 'adjusted' to allow our new guest the place of honor at the head of the table. Later that evening I was reminded that we would have to find a “more permanent location” for my “new hobby”.
An upstairs bedroom is the latest venue for my shack. A used L-shaped desk with hutch from craigslist has made a nice home for my radio collection. Rounding out the Drake Station is an T-4XB Transmitter, MN-4 antenna tuner & MS-4 Speaker. On the Yaesu side of the shack is the FT-897D controlled with Ham Radio Deluxe Software and my Yaesu vintage station that includes FT-101E, YC-601 Digital Display, YO-100 Scope & SP-101 Speaker/phone patch. I also enjoy listening to the Hellicrafters SX-43 Receiver through the R-46 Speaker. Antennas include the Hy-gain vertical AV-18VS for 10, 15, 20, 40, and 80 Meters and a dual band Crushcraft for 2 meters & 440. I enjoy both the convenience of the modern radios and the heritage associated with the vintage rigs. Some nights I like to fire up the vintage stations, turn off the lights, sit back, watch them glow and just listen to the radio.
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K9SLY is Connected to the following - 8/27/2010 6:40:04 AM

DY1TPS YC1BJX 2E0CTX
K9SLY Uploaded a Picture - 8/27/2010 6:40:04 AM


QSL Card
QSL Card

K9SLY's Blog Post - 8/27/2010 6:37:26 AM

Sharpen your Skills thru Contesting

When I started in amateur radio one of the things that interested me was contesting. The first time I tuned in and heard a station calling CQ CQ Contest, I listened to the pile up of operators trying to get there call sign heard so the contester would acknowledge his call above all others. Then the exchange that took place was swift and graceful.
I continued to listen for the next twenty minutes to this operator work stations, sorting out calls and directing traffic on the frequency like a traffic cop. He would take call signs give signal reports and swap ID numbers and he never missed a beat. I soon realized if the time ever came when as a RACES member I had to handle a pile up or a directed net I would need to be as cool and methodical as he was especially if I was involved in a major incident.

I began to follow the schedule for contests and I would work a few stations, getting the exchange down, fill out the log and send them in to the club sponsoring the event. I enjoyed making contacts with other operators in the different state QSO Parties and when conditions were right I was making 200 to 300 contacts per event. The more I worked the better I got at tuning in stations, making the exchange and logging the contacts at the same time. I also got better at pulling out stations I could barely hear during noisy conditions and handling multiple operators trying to contact me.

All these skills can be helpful when working as net control for Skywarn, a weekly exercise net or a special event. After the contests the QSO Cards started pouring in and most contest organizers send a nice certificate acknowledging your participation. So if you are just beginning in amateur radio or want to sharpen your skills try working a few contests.

Contesting tips:
Schedule your contest in advance – Know what contest you want to work. Set aside the day or weekend to operate.

Set goals– How long will you operate, how many contacts do you want to make? What mode will you operate?
Maybe you want to try working mobile or expedition.

Have an operational plan – Know how long you want to work and schedule breaks. Know what frequencies to work and when based on propagation openings.
Will you squat on one frequency or band surf?

Check out your equipment – Check your antennas and radios on all bands your going to work. Check your computer, logging software and back up battery. Have extra pencils and paper on hand.

Review the Rules - Read the rules of the contest and know your frequency/band limits. Know the proper exchange. Set your logging software to handle the multipliers. Know the best way to submit your logs for credit.

Listen, Listen, Listen – The best way to learn how to contest is to listen to the contesters. You will hear the good ones and the bad ones. You can pick up tips and model your exchanges after them.

Have Fun - Enjoy the contest and you will be amazed at the people you contact and the things you will learn.

Hey you never know when you might need those skills in an emergency.

Dan
K9SLY
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K9SLY is Connected to the following - 8/26/2010 6:57:09 PM

KD0JCW
K9SLY Uploaded a Picture - 8/26/2010 6:57:09 PM


K9SLY
K9SLY

K9SLY Joined My Ham Shack - 8/26/2010 7:21:58 AM


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